Improving the Clarity of a Mix

Isolating and bringing out individual parts when mixing, and improving the overall clarity of a track can be challenging as an amateur producer. It’s easy to mistakenly believe that there is a single ‘magic’ solution, that through lack of experience you don’t know about. The reality is that magic solutions rarely exist, and achieving improved mix clarity is usually the result of a series of small changes, which sound insignificant in isolation, but combine to make to fairly major change to the mix.

Cantana 2 was the first track I’d written which used an acoustic sound (i.e. piano) for its main theme. This presented some new challenges in terms of getting a fairly dynamic acoustic sound to sufficiently stand out over other parts. In this post I’m going to go through a series of small changes I used which helped me to get the piano sitting much more prominently in the mix, to separate it from the pad sound in the track, and to improve the overall clarity of the mix.

The starting point is a clip from the very early stages of sequencing and mixing the track. At this stage there was little delay, and no reverb across mix (hence the fairly raw sound compared to the final version on soundcloud)…

Initial clip

The first step to try to bring out the piano was to apply a compressor to it. I used Waves Renaissance Axx with the following settings…

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…which evened out the general level of the piano and made it a little more ‘intelligible’ (apologies for the loss of one channel of the pad during the first part of the clip)…

Compression on piano

Next I applied EQ to both the piano and pad sounds, using the following curves. Notice that the 2 curves are complimentary, in that they accentuate different frequency ranges in each sound…

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Pad EQ
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Piano EQ

EQ on piano and pad

Next I used Voxengo MSED to slightly reduce the sides component of both sounds. Often to separate sounds you can use opposing settings on each (i.e. one wider and one narrower, to separate them). In this case I felt that both the piano and pad were a bit too wide, and were getting lost against the bass and drums, and the pad especially was dropping too much level when the track was monoed. I reduced the sides component of the pad and piano by 2.6dB and 2dB respectively…

Reduced sides component on piano and pad

I felt like there were still too much ‘mud’ in the mix, and a big contributor to this was that both these main sounds were competing in the low/mid range. High pass filtering the piano made it sound a bit synthetic and unnatural, so I added a high pass filter at around 400Hz to the existing EQ curve on the pad…

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High-pass filter on pad

Using compression sidechained by the bass drum on instrument sounds has been a well used technique in electronic styles for a while. In this case I used Noisebud’s ‘Lazy Kenneth’ to simulate the effect of sidechained compression on the pad, to make a bit more general ‘space’ for the other sounds…

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(Simulated) sidechained compression on pad

I was still not happy with the clarity of the pad sound. When creating and auditioning it in isolation I’d used a low-pass filter with quite a lot of resonance. This sounded good on it’s own, but was not sitting well in the mix. I was one of the filter modules in Kontakt, and I reduced the resonance amount from 46 to 31% (and made a similar, proportional change in places where the resonance was automated)…

Reduced pad filter resonance

This final step in this series of changes was to try and further separate the pad and piano by using volume automation to drop the pad level by 1dB whenever the piano was playing…

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Volume automation on pad

Ultimately I used further tweaks and processing after this to arrive at the final mix, but this series of steps shows the main changes I made to try and separate out the pad and piano. Listening to the first and the last clip, there’s a significant difference in the overall clarity of the mix (and even moreso comparing the first clip to the final mix on soundcloud).

Hopefully this gives some insights and ideas on techniques to improve your mixes, and demonstrates that usually it’s the sumtotal of multiple subtle changes that give an overall significant difference in the clarity and quality of a mix.

 

Noise Reducing Percussion Samples

A quick tech ‘how to’ post today… around noise reduction in live-recorded samples.  As I’ve mentioned previously, I use a lot of live recorded sounds in my tracks, especially live recorded percussive sounds.  Sometimes these sounds can be recorded quietly in the studio, but other times I capture them ‘on location’, and hence have to work with background noise.  On other occasions the background noise is unavoidably entwined with the sound source.  This was the case today when I recorded some tom sounds from the Volca Beats speaker.  The direct sound from this Volca is fairly useable , but the speaker is really hissy, and hence I ended up with a lot of hiss in the sample…

The raw sample

In the past I used to try and remove this in one of two ways…

  1. Use a high shelf filter to reduce the hiss
  2. Use a gate to fade out the tail of the sample

…but neither of these were ideal… the filter option would remove high frequency content from the whole sample including the attack part (which can significantly alter the sound).  The gate avoids that problem, but requires that you find a trade off between cutting the low frequency content of the tail (using a short release time), and ending up with audible hiss remaining in the tail (using a longer release time).

But, using automation you can combine the above approaches and get a much better result than either in isolation.  The trick is to use a high shelf filter, but automate the gain/level control, so that it’s very quickly attenuated just after the attack of the sound is finished.  The screens below demonstrate the setup in Reaper.  First you import the sample into an empty track.  Then add a high shelf filter into the FX chain (I’m using Reaper’s built-in ‘ReaEQ’ below to keep things simple).  Then automate the gain/level control of the filter (using the ‘Track Envelopes/Automation’ button on the track control)…

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Reaper track ‘Envelopes/Automation’ window

Then draw an automation curve as shown in the below screen…

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Automation curve
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ReaEQ settings (‘Gain’ is controlled by the automation)

Depending on the nature of the sample, you’ll want to try adjusting the 4 highlighted parameters above to get the noise-reduced version sounding right…

  • The point where the filter starts to drop
  • The time the filter takes to get to minimum gain, and the shape of the curve (above option is using the Reaper ‘fast start’ point shape)
  • The frequency and bandwidth/Q of the filter

If it’s an excessively noisy sample, a low pass filter might also work better than high shelf.

In this case, the same sample with the above settings turned out like this…

The ‘noise-reduced’ sample

… that’s a considerable amount of noise reduction, but has maintained all the attack and general timbre of the sound.