Spending Time Appropriately

I’ve blogged before several times about sample manipulation and clean up (i.e. EQ, compression, gating, etc…).  I use a lot of live-sampled sounds in my tracks, often as main/key elements in the overall composition.  So in these cases, properly cleaning up and compressing samples is really important, if I want these elements to stand out well and sound clean in the mix.

For the track I’m working on at the moment, I’m in the middle of doing all the incidentals, and part of that is incidental percussion.  I usually first sequence all of these sounds in the track’s Reaper project, and afterwards go through and automate EQ and compression to get them sitting in the mix properly (usually with a single EQ and compressor instance and using automation to adjust the parameters for each incidental).  That process can be pretty tedious, so I decided this time I’d do all the sample EQ and compression up front (i.e. before sequencing) in audio editing software.  This also was pretty daunting at first, because I had about 20 samples to treat, and I usually spend a good 5-10 minutes per sample finding the right EQ and compression settings, and auditioning on monitors and close listening through headphones.  But as I started working through them, I realised I didn’t need to spend so long on each one…

For samples which are used as key elements in the track, overly careful EQ and compression is really important… your key elements will either comprise the main ‘themes’ of a track, or at a minimum occur many times during the track’s progression… hence you need to spend time making fine and careful adjustments to get them sounding as good as possible.  On the other hand, the incidental samples I was working on might play in total a couple of times at most during the entire progression… plus they often occur at sonically ‘busy’ parts of the track (builds, peak points, etc…), where slight quality issues (like a tiny bit of distortion, or slightly wrong EQ) will likely be masked by all the other sounds occurring at the same time.

It made me realise I could afford to be (what I would usually consider) a bit ‘sloppy’ with my approach to this sample editing… only audition on monitors, and sometimes running mild effects like a slight limiting or compression with minimal or no auditioning (I use Waves L1 and C1 a lot for this purpose, and have used them so much I can usually apply mild adjustments without needing to audibly auditioning).  And more generally it made me think about using your time appropriately.  Time is a precious commodity for a producer… particularly if it’s not your profession and you have limited time to start with.  So you need to really think about the areas where it’s necessary to spend time, and the areas where you can afford to take a more ‘quick fix’ approach.

Procrastination

I’m finally on the ‘home straight’ of a track that started out simple, and has ended up taking ridiculously long to finish.  I’m basically at the stage now where there’s two significant things that need to be done in addition to mixing and general final polishing… ‘decorating’ the build/peak points of the track, and adding all the incidentals.  Even though these two tasks should be straightforward, I’ve been subconsciously dodging them for the last week or two… and I’m now at point where I’ve done every other minute (and occasionally unnecessary) tweak to other parts of the track in an inadvertent effort to avoid them.

Today I consciously realised that I’ve been side-stepping these tasks for days, and after some thought the reason became clear.  Both of them are time consuming, and a little tedious… often involving listening over and over to small sections of the track and making repeated small changes to automation curves.  It’s a ‘routine’, rather than ‘creative’ process… I can clearly envisage the end point I want to be at, but unfortunately getting there requires a lot of time, trial and error, and repetition of the same task.

Interestingly, before 2016 I often experienced similar procrastination when trying to come up with new ideas for tracks and parts within tracks.  However, now that’s a process I usually enjoy… so it made me think about what’s changed.  I think it boils down to 2 main things…

  1. A lot of the procrastination around coming up with new track ideas stemmed from a fear of failure… i.e. fear of the disappointment of spending a lot of time trying things, and not coming up with anything good.  Now though, I really look forward to and enjoy discovering new ideas.  My experience during 2016 proved on numerous occasions that I could come up with ideas that were way outside of my expectation, imagination, and perceived limits of my own ability.  The fear has been replaced by a curiousness, and almost an excitement about what kind of ideas I’ll discover, that I can’t imagine right now.
  2. My understanding and knowledge of the instruments I’m using has improved a lot… not only can I experiment with more ideas in a shorter time, but I have a greater ability to think about a way of manipulating or creating sound, and then actually realising that sound through the equipment (i.e I’m better to being able to audibly create sounds I can hear in my head).

So I’ve eliminated procrastination in writing new material, but it’s still slowing me down with more routine tasks.  I think it boils down to what I touched on in point 1 above, and can be well explained using the following analogy… Coming up with new track ideas has become like going on holiday to a country you’ve never been to before… you don’t know what you’ll discover, but there’s a fair chance it will be new and exciting, and even the process of getting there is often an adventure.  Conversely, creating incidental parts is a bit like doing the weekly shop for a big family… the end result is not particularly outstanding nor exciting, but is necessary… and the process of getting it done is lengthy and a repeat of something you’ve done many times before.

So what’s the answer to avoid procrastinating? Unfortunately I don’t have any easy nor groundbreaking solution… what needs to be done can be easily interpreted from a quote I heard many times from former mentor (and i believe variations of which have been used by Lewis Carroll, George Harrison and others)… “If you don’t know where you’re going, any road will do”… i.e the best thing you can do is just make a start and get moving.

I guess I’ll leave it there… I’ve got shopping to do.

Breaking Musical Rules 2

This is the second in set of examples of musical structures which sound good despite being well outside of the rules of traditional Western music theory, and revolves around pad sounds.

Pad sounds usually exist (as the name suggests!) to ‘pad-out’ an arrangement, and give it some additional texture and depth.  As they’re usually designed to sit behind the main instruments/elements of a track, you can often get away with more abstract textures, created by more complex chords.  I can still clearly remember my eureka moment many years ago, when I discovered that really nice pad sounds could be made with a low-pass filtered synth patch, played by a thick, jazzy chord (9th, 11th, etc…).

During 2016 I experimented quite a lot with different ways of making pad sounds, and discovered that you don’t have to limit textures to complex jazz chords… you can use all kinds of diatonic structures and ‘chords’ which are way outside of the bounds of traditional music theory.

The example I’ll use is part of the pad sound I used in ‘Push On‘.  I used a couple of different instrument layers to arrive at the final sound, but one of those layers used a preset sound from Spectrasonics Atmosphere.  The soloed layer sounds like this…

… and was played using the following ‘chord’…

breaking-musical-rules-2-1

That’s basically the first 4 intervals of a C major scale played together in consecutive octaves.  It’s also miles away from anything that you’d learn from traditional Western music theory (it can actually be ‘played’ by two very comfortably spaced fists on the keyboard!).  This is the kind of chord I would never expect to fit into anything but the most avante-garde of music styles (due to preconceived ideas of what harmonies will work), and hence would be very unlikely to try or experiment with when putting a track together.  But I discovered last year that you can often use these types of complex and unconventional chords for pads (I used similar and often more complex chords in other tracks I produced in 2016 aswell).

Part of what makes it possible is the use of low-pass filtering in pad instruments.  If you were to play the same chord on a loud piano or with an orchestral string patch, the mash of upper harmonics it would produce would sound quite messy and dissonant (like playing the piano with your fist!).  But as this patch has a lot of those upper harmonics rolled off, it allows more complex (and traditionally dissonant) sets of intervals to work better together.

Just as a reference, a single note played on the same Atmosphere patch sounds like this (with no high-pass filter and hence more low end)…

When creating pad sounds, it’s worth messing around with complex and unconventional chords and intervals.  It often allows you to create much more texturally rich and deep sounds than you could achieve with more traditional chords, but still maintaining consonance in the overall result.

Getting Into a Mental Space To Be Creative

If you want to make the most the time you devote to writing or producing, you can’t constrain yourself to only working effectively when you feel inspired

In my usual (i.e pre-2016) work as a system engineer, I never used to have to think much about getting into the right mental space in order to work productively.  Ofcourse making software is fundamentally a very different discipline to producing music, but I always found with software I could start working pretty much immediately… there was a clear, tangible problem that needed to be solved, and to get to the solution you just had to start working on it.

With music production it’s often very different… to be effective (and sometimes just to get started well), it’s important to be in a creative headspace.  This is moreso the case with certain stages of the production process… e.g. being in a creative headspace is much more important if I’m trying to come up with new parts or tracks, than it is if I’m doing something more routine like mixing.

Also, the success of the start of a day producing can be heavily influenced by the success (of lack thereof) of the previous day.  Specifically… if I’ve ended the previous day frustrated that no good ideas were coming, or trying unsuccessfully to fix a problem in the mix, it could make it more difficult to motivate yourself, and to get off to a positive start.

So, it’s critical to try and get yourself into a mental space that’s conducive to being creative… and a really good routine I’ve found to do this is…

  1. Start the morning in a place separate to the studio – It can be difficult/intense to spend 8+ hours a day in a single room… I particularly found this in early 2016, having come from a busy and spacious office environment and constantly changing locations (for meetings etc…), to being stuck in one small room and in front of a PC all day.  I would always start the day in a completely separate physical space (usually a coffee shop close to home).
  2. Listen to some music you like – This is something I usually do while having said coffee.  It always helps to spur creativity by absorbing inspiring examples from the same creative discipline.
  3. Read some material which gets you thinking in depth about producing – For me, this is the most important technique… if I can read something inspiring about production (or in fact anything music related), it immerses your thoughts in that space, and has a hugely positive effect on getting you into a creative place.  It’s also a great antidote to the kind of frustrations or lack of inspiration mentioned above… often giving you fresh ideas, or approaches on how to attack a problem.  Specifically, the material I commonly use is…
  • Inspiring music news sites and blogs (CDM is a favourite for me)
  • Seeing how other producers approach their work (e.g video channels like Fact TV and Electronic Beats)
  • Magazines like Sound on Sound… esp practical columns like Session Notes, Inside Track, and Mix Rescue

Inspiration tends to come and go unpredictably… and if you want to make the most the time you devote to writing or producing, you can’t constrain yourself to only working effectively when you feel inspired.  Being able to put yourself into a more creative headspace moves you towards having more control over periods of inspiration, and allows you to best utilize your time.

Noise Reducing Percussion Samples

A quick tech ‘how to’ post today… around noise reduction in live-recorded samples.  As I’ve mentioned previously, I use a lot of live recorded sounds in my tracks, especially live recorded percussive sounds.  Sometimes these sounds can be recorded quietly in the studio, but other times I capture them ‘on location’, and hence have to work with background noise.  On other occasions the background noise is unavoidably entwined with the sound source.  This was the case today when I recorded some tom sounds from the Volca Beats speaker.  The direct sound from this Volca is fairly useable , but the speaker is really hissy, and hence I ended up with a lot of hiss in the sample…

The raw sample

In the past I used to try and remove this in one of two ways…

  1. Use a high shelf filter to reduce the hiss
  2. Use a gate to fade out the tail of the sample

…but neither of these were ideal… the filter option would remove high frequency content from the whole sample including the attack part (which can significantly alter the sound).  The gate avoids that problem, but requires that you find a trade off between cutting the low frequency content of the tail (using a short release time), and ending up with audible hiss remaining in the tail (using a longer release time).

But, using automation you can combine the above approaches and get a much better result than either in isolation.  The trick is to use a high shelf filter, but automate the gain/level control, so that it’s very quickly attenuated just after the attack of the sound is finished.  The screens below demonstrate the setup in Reaper.  First you import the sample into an empty track.  Then add a high shelf filter into the FX chain (I’m using Reaper’s built-in ‘ReaEQ’ below to keep things simple).  Then automate the gain/level control of the filter (using the ‘Track Envelopes/Automation’ button on the track control)…

noise-reducing-percussion-samples-1
Reaper track ‘Envelopes/Automation’ window

Then draw an automation curve as shown in the below screen…

noise-reducing-percussion-samples-2
Automation curve
noise-reducing-percussion-samples-3
ReaEQ settings (‘Gain’ is controlled by the automation)

Depending on the nature of the sample, you’ll want to try adjusting the 4 highlighted parameters above to get the noise-reduced version sounding right…

  • The point where the filter starts to drop
  • The time the filter takes to get to minimum gain, and the shape of the curve (above option is using the Reaper ‘fast start’ point shape)
  • The frequency and bandwidth/Q of the filter

If it’s an excessively noisy sample, a low pass filter might also work better than high shelf.

In this case, the same sample with the above settings turned out like this…

The ‘noise-reduced’ sample

… that’s a considerable amount of noise reduction, but has maintained all the attack and general timbre of the sound.

Breaking Musical Rules 1

In my recent post on questioning ‘Does Knowing Musical Theory Help Production?‘, I said I’d give a few examples of where I found a musical structure that was outside the rules of traditional Western music theory, but sounded good none the less… so here’s the first example…

My most recent track on soundcloud ‘Cantana 1‘, has a bassline whose pitch rolls around a lot through portamento… but is centred around an A note… hence you could say the track is in the key of A.  But… the main synth ‘stab’ and vocal pad sounds are based around a B flat minor chord.  That’s a semitone away from the key of the track, and is about as far detached as you can get from ‘correct’ structure and harmony according to the rules of classical Western music theory I learnt from the AMEB.  With this semitone interval the track sounds like this (as per soundcloud)…

…if I was to pitch the stab and pad sounds down a semitone to match the key of the bassline, it would sound like this…

Interesting huh?  It’s subjective, but although the second clip does sound more ‘correct’ in terms of harmony, the odd interval in the original version gives it a more dark, and unresolved sound… and to me, ultimately makes a better track.

Looking back, I’m a bit surprised I discovered using a bassline and chord separated by a semitone at all.  When I’m putting together the various layers of a track, I’m usually implicitly aware of what key the track is in, and that leads me towards preconceived ideas of what harmonies will work, and what won’t (these kind-of ‘burned in constraints’ I mentioned in the previous post).  Given that traditional theory would say that a tonic and tonic + 1 semitone interval would not work, I’m surprised I even experimented with that combination in the first place.  I can only guess I had adopted a kind of ‘hit random chords’ approach to finding new parts, and just happened to stumble on this semitone part that happened to work well.

Anyway, the takeaway is to try and keep an open mind when you’re coming up with new parts and ideas.  Use any knowledge of music theory you have to help expedite the process, but don’t get caught up in letting that knowledge restrict your ability to discover things.

I’ll post more examples soon.

The ‘Rule of 3s’ for Incidentals

A month or so ago, I read an article on musicradar article entitled ‘Robin Schulz’s top 10 tips for producers‘.  I hadn’t heard of Robin until that point, but I really resonated with the advice that he was giving… the stuff he covered was generally also the stuff I tend to think of as key techniques to producing successfully.  I checked out one of his tracks on YouTube too… ‘Prayer In C‘.  The track has an incidental build almost right at the start (0:05)… but surprising for commercial music, the texture of this build is quite thin and sparse… consisting of mainly just a lone white noise sweep, and tends to come in a bit predictably.  It’s similar to the kind of use of this sound that you find in more amateur, ‘bedroom’-type productions.  I’m not at all trying to be critical of the production (I wouldn’t have a leg to stand on as obviously Robin is at least 1000x more famous than me!)… but it’s interesting to observe, because it does stand-out somewhat from most highly polished and produced tracks from big names.

It got me thinking about things that distinguish ‘bedroom’ sounding productions from those from big names on big labels… and one of the major differences from my perspective is the use and depth of incidental sounds.  My general impression is that highly ‘professional’ sounding tracks tend to have multiple layers of complexly woven and sculpted incidental sounds… the kind of thing that adds a subtle but critical sheen of additional depth and detail to a track.  A really good example of this that comes to mind is Sasha’s ‘Invol2ver’ album.  The interesting thing about these types of incidentals is that you don’t usually explicitly hear them when listening to a track… but if they’re removed, suddenly something major is missing and the track sounds much less polished and professional.

Along these lines, for all the tracks I worked on during 2016, I adopted an approach with incidental sounds which I’ve since come to refer to as ‘the rule of 3s’.  That is… for any major build or transition point in a track, I try to have at least 3 separate layers of incidental sounds happening at the one time.  The reason for this… having just 1 or 2 layers of incidentals at such points seems to end up being too obvious… the listener can distinguish each of the layers and the build becomes somewhat predictable.  But for me, 3 layers is the sweet spot where suddenly the layers of incidental, along with whatever instrument sounds are in the track itself, combine to make it difficult for the listener to be conscious of all the layers individually… the sound becomes harder to predict and hence more interesting.

So based on this thinking, I try to make sure I use at least 3 layers of incidental sound at any major build or transition in a track.  You have to temper that according to the style aswell… progressive-type tracks tend to do well with more layers of incidental than harder, more minimal styles… but I think 3 layers is a good baseline to follow.  As a typical default, I would have those 3 layers consist of…

  • A longer white noise swell-type sound
  • A shorter swell (e.g. reversed cymbal)
  • Some type of percussion, possibly through a delay effect

…and make sure that each layer has individual panning to control the side to side depth, aswell as EQ automation to control the front to back.

As an example, the clip below contains the soloed incidental parts from the build starting at 2:43 in Summer Wave

This actually contains about 5 layers on the build/swell side (3 swell-type sounds plus 2 percussive), and 2 or 3 crash cymbal-type sounds layered together… that’s leaning towards being a bit excessive, but also gives the track a lot of depth, and that more ‘professional’ sound I mentioned earlier (and given the more progressive style it lends itself to greater depth of incidental sounds).

If you’re a producer, striving to make your tracks sound more professional or polished, I’d highly recommend you look at your use of incidental sounds… and if you’re only using a couple of layers consider thickening the texture and apply the ‘rule of 3s’.

 

(Disclaimer: A acknowledge that these days the term ‘bedroom productions’ has no correlation with being amateur or unprofessional… as many famous commercial productions are indeed conceived and realized in a bedroom!)