Breaking Musical Rules 1

In my recent post on questioning ‘Does Knowing Musical Theory Help Production?‘, I said I’d give a few examples of where I found a musical structure that was outside the rules of traditional Western music theory, but sounded good none the less… so here’s the first example…

My most recent track on soundcloud ‘Cantana 1‘, has a bassline whose pitch rolls around a lot through portamento… but is centred around an A note… hence you could say the track is in the key of A.  But… the main synth ‘stab’ and vocal pad sounds are based around a B flat minor chord.  That’s a semitone away from the key of the track, and is about as far detached as you can get from ‘correct’ structure and harmony according to the rules of classical Western music theory I learnt from the AMEB.  With this semitone interval the track sounds like this (as per soundcloud)…

…if I was to pitch the stab and pad sounds down a semitone to match the key of the bassline, it would sound like this…

Interesting huh?  It’s subjective, but although the second clip does sound more ‘correct’ in terms of harmony, the odd interval in the original version gives it a more dark, and unresolved sound… and to me, ultimately makes a better track.

Looking back, I’m a bit surprised I discovered using a bassline and chord separated by a semitone at all.  When I’m putting together the various layers of a track, I’m usually implicitly aware of what key the track is in, and that leads me towards preconceived ideas of what harmonies will work, and what won’t (these kind-of ‘burned in constraints’ I mentioned in the previous post).  Given that traditional theory would say that a tonic and tonic + 1 semitone interval would not work, I’m surprised I even experimented with that combination in the first place.  I can only guess I had adopted a kind of ‘hit random chords’ approach to finding new parts, and just happened to stumble on this semitone part that happened to work well.

Anyway, the takeaway is to try and keep an open mind when you’re coming up with new parts and ideas.  Use any knowledge of music theory you have to help expedite the process, but don’t get caught up in letting that knowledge restrict your ability to discover things.

I’ll post more examples soon.

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