The ‘Rule of 3s’ for Incidentals

A month or so ago, I read an article on musicradar article entitled ‘Robin Schulz’s top 10 tips for producers‘.  I hadn’t heard of Robin until that point, but I really resonated with the advice that he was giving… the stuff he covered was generally also the stuff I tend to think of as key techniques to producing successfully.  I checked out one of his tracks on YouTube too… ‘Prayer In C‘.  The track has an incidental build almost right at the start (0:05)… but surprising for commercial music, the texture of this build is quite thin and sparse… consisting of mainly just a lone white noise sweep, and tends to come in a bit predictably.  It’s similar to the kind of use of this sound that you find in more amateur, ‘bedroom’-type productions.  I’m not at all trying to be critical of the production (I wouldn’t have a leg to stand on as obviously Robin is at least 1000x more famous than me!)… but it’s interesting to observe, because it does stand-out somewhat from most highly polished and produced tracks from big names.

It got me thinking about things that distinguish ‘bedroom’ sounding productions from those from big names on big labels… and one of the major differences from my perspective is the use and depth of incidental sounds.  My general impression is that highly ‘professional’ sounding tracks tend to have multiple layers of complexly woven and sculpted incidental sounds… the kind of thing that adds a subtle but critical sheen of additional depth and detail to a track.  A really good example of this that comes to mind is Sasha’s ‘Invol2ver’ album.  The interesting thing about these types of incidentals is that you don’t usually explicitly hear them when listening to a track… but if they’re removed, suddenly something major is missing and the track sounds much less polished and professional.

Along these lines, for all the tracks I worked on during 2016, I adopted an approach with incidental sounds which I’ve since come to refer to as ‘the rule of 3s’.  That is… for any major build or transition point in a track, I try to have at least 3 separate layers of incidental sounds happening at the one time.  The reason for this… having just 1 or 2 layers of incidentals at such points seems to end up being too obvious… the listener can distinguish each of the layers and the build becomes somewhat predictable.  But for me, 3 layers is the sweet spot where suddenly the layers of incidental, along with whatever instrument sounds are in the track itself, combine to make it difficult for the listener to be conscious of all the layers individually… the sound becomes harder to predict and hence more interesting.

So based on this thinking, I try to make sure I use at least 3 layers of incidental sound at any major build or transition in a track.  You have to temper that according to the style aswell… progressive-type tracks tend to do well with more layers of incidental than harder, more minimal styles… but I think 3 layers is a good baseline to follow.  As a typical default, I would have those 3 layers consist of…

  • A longer white noise swell-type sound
  • A shorter swell (e.g. reversed cymbal)
  • Some type of percussion, possibly through a delay effect

…and make sure that each layer has individual panning to control the side to side depth, aswell as EQ automation to control the front to back.

As an example, the clip below contains the soloed incidental parts from the build starting at 2:43 in Summer Wave

This actually contains about 5 layers on the build/swell side (3 swell-type sounds plus 2 percussive), and 2 or 3 crash cymbal-type sounds layered together… that’s leaning towards being a bit excessive, but also gives the track a lot of depth, and that more ‘professional’ sound I mentioned earlier (and given the more progressive style it lends itself to greater depth of incidental sounds).

If you’re a producer, striving to make your tracks sound more professional or polished, I’d highly recommend you look at your use of incidental sounds… and if you’re only using a couple of layers consider thickening the texture and apply the ‘rule of 3s’.

 

(Disclaimer: A acknowledge that these days the term ‘bedroom productions’ has no correlation with being amateur or unprofessional… as many famous commercial productions are indeed conceived and realized in a bedroom!)

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