Cleaning Up a Mix

there’s usually not one magic fix in order to realise a fairly abstract goal like ‘make the mix clearer’

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Over the last week I’ve been finalizing the mix of a new track (Summer Wave).  In terms of sound texture, it’s the ‘thickest’ track I’ve written this year, with quite a lot of instrument and percussion layers mixed together.  The thicker the texture of a track gets, the more challenging the mixing process becomes, as you’ve got more layers of sound, and more frequencies competing to be heard in a limited space.  Hence, early in the process when I started with a rough sequenced mix, one of the first things I wanted to do was clean up the mix… to remove ‘mud’ and make the individual layers more distinct and audible.  Generally I find that in removing ‘mud’ from a mix, there’s usually no one ‘silver bullet’ solution, and the improvement comes from repeated iterations of small fixes.  That was the case here, but there were 2 changes which both made a significant improvement to cleaning up the mix.

The rough mix sounded like this…

…not too bad for a first cut, but i wanted the individual elements to be clearer.  While doing some cleanup work on some of the individual layers, I soloed this ‘glass bottle’ track (so named because it came from a sample of a glass bottle being tapped on a tiled floor)…

I was surprised at how much low frequency content there was in this part… especially because i usually high pass filter the raw samples of sounds like this long before I get to the mixing stage.  The sample had a loud transient ‘thud’ sound at the start at approx 135Hz.  This sat right in the frequency range of both the bass line and the ‘meat’ of the bass drum, and given the ‘glass bottle’ sound had been included for its high frequency, bell-like rhythmic pattern, this sound down around 135 Hz was redundant, and was probably just ‘muddying’ the sound of the bass drum and bass line.  I initially applied a high pass filter at ~300Hz, but after a few more iterations of review decided I could set it at 518Hz without detracting in any way from the part of the glass bottle sound I wanted to hear.  The soloed glass bottle sounded like this with 518Hz high pass filter applied…

The full mix after this change, sounded like this….

Granted its subtle, but to me there’s a definite improvement in the ‘smoothness’ of the bass line (because the rhythmic pulsing at around 135 Hz caused by the glass bottle pattern has been removed).  And importantly, as discussed at the start of the post, it’s an important step in the iterative process of cleaning up the overall sound.  (Note – to more clearly hear the ‘smoothing’ in the final full mix, download the before and after mix clips and A/B them with a low pass filter at about 200Hz).

More towards the end of the mix process, i was reasonably happy with the overall sound of the mix on my monitors, but i felt that the synth ‘stab’ sound was not clear enough in the mix when auditioned through my tablet and earbuds.  The mix at this point sounded like this…

After soloing some of the parts, i realised that one of the background percussion parts (sourced from a sample of an aluminium coke can) had a note which played at the same time as the synth stab…

Coke can…

Synth stab…

The problem was that the fundamental of that first coke can note was at 221Hz (the A below middle C), and that same A was one of the notes in the synth stab chord.  Basically the 2 sounds were competing for the same frequency space.  Give that first note of the coke can was really just a grace note to the second higher and more prominent note, I made a 3.3dB cut at 221Hz on the coke can track, which resulted in…

And sounded like this in the context of the whole mix…

To me this made a pretty significant contribution to allowing the stab sound to sit more clearly in the mix.

Again, my experience is that there’s usually not one magic fix in order to realise a fairly abstract goal like ‘make the mix clearer’.  But through iterative and successive iterations of fixes like those above, high-level overall improvements can be achieved.

 

 

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